Waterside Stud

BURROW & CAVIARY - OUR SET UP

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Waterside Stud has expanded!! We now have three small (but perfectly formed!) sheds, one for the Guinea Pigs ("The Piggery") and one for the Nethies ("The Burrow"). The third shed, "Mini Lop Lodge" is our newest venture and homes our beautiful Mini Lop rabbits.

The sheds are fully equipped with electric lighting and timer switches, fans, fly zappers and our infamous webcams which are rigged up to the TV in the bedroom where we can keep our eye on expectant mums, holiday boarders and basically just watch and enjoy the piggies and bunnies whilst we're back in the house.

We have Avondale blocks of 12 hutches in two of the sheds with a further block of 4 hutches in "The Piggery" and 3 in "The Burrow". A block of 14 hutches are used in "Mini Lop Lodge" with an extra block of 3 to house weaning babies.

We have incorporated inner doors on all three sheds (covered with mesh) meaning that the main doors can be left open, weather permitting, to allow light and a constant airflow throughout the day.

Hay, food etc are all kept in clean containers and then we have a few essentials such as combs, nail clippers, shampoo, medication, calendars, white boards and information profiles to name but a few.

Last but not least are my comfortable chairs and cushions on which I am often found sitting and enjoying my glass of wine enjoying spending time with the inhabitants!!

All of our pets enjoy exercise in the garden weather permitting. See Photos's on our Garden Adventures page.

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     PICTURED ABOVE, "THE PIGGERY", "THE BURROW" AND "MINI LOP LODGE"

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**PLEASE NOTE** Although we would love for everyone to view our set-up firsthand we do have to take into account the peace and quiet needed by our Guinea Pig / Rabbit mums and their babies and therefore COLLECTIONS WILL BE MADE FROM THE HOUSE ONLY.

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